Orchard at Fishkill Farms (photo courtesy of Treasury Cider)

New Offerings from Treasury Cider in Fishkill!

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Located in East Fishkill, west from Beacon and north of the Hudson Highlands in one of the most picturesque parts of New York state, Fishkill Farms was founded by Henry Morgenthau Jr., who purchased the land in 1914. After a career as a farmer and a conservationist he became the Secretary of the Treasury under FDR. Treasury Cider is named in his honor and continues to be owned and operated by his family to this day.

The apple orchards here are some of the oldest in the Hudson Valley and offer a huge number of varieties: many modern, many heirloom, and everything in between. Since 2009 the farm has gone entirely without the use of synthetic fertilizers. Today we are excited to offer a broad array of their substantial offerings.

Before we start, a brief note on apple cultivars. Due to their long history in places where people speak English, apple types have an extraordinary range of evocative old-timey names. Some that are found in these ciders include: Cornish Gillyflower, Sheepnose, Goldrush, Hyslop Crab, Ashmead's Kernel, Porter's Perfection, and Brown Snout.

In addition, due to its long history as an orchard state, many of these apple types come from New York. Following is a little history of autochthonous apple cultivars found in the Treasury Ciders on offer today:

Newtown Pippin: Originating in Newtown, a town named in 1664 and once the county seat of Queens county, now the neighborhood of Elmhurst (the name remains for Newtown Creek, the festering inlet separating the northern reaches of Greenpoint from the warehouses of southern Long Island City). This "pippin", a term for a cultivar that originated as a seed, not a graft, was first grown on a farm near where the Elmhurst subway station stands today.

Esopus Spitzenburg: This type was found hanging on a tree in the early 18th-century in Esopus, on the banks of the Hudson just south of Kingston, New York's first state capital. This apple was a favorite of Thomas Jefferson's, who planted them at Monticello.

Lastly, the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station in Geneva, at the northern tip of Seneca Lake, has been responsible for breeding some of the most popular and consequential apple types for use in cider, baking, or eating. These inlude the Cortland, Empire, Jonagold, Jonamac, and Macoun cultivars.

Today we have five fantastic ciders to offer you. The 2016 Homestead Semi-Dry is your classic slightly-sweet/slightly-sparkling cider for those who want a refreshing summer beverage. We also have the 2016 Centennial Still Cider, which has no bubbles and is very dry, with loads of minerality and a firm tannic grip. One of the things I like about ciders is that they are in a lot of ways similar to orange wines: light, refreshing, but with a sometimes surprising amount of tannic structure.

We also have three of Treasury's amazing unfiltered bottle-conditioned ciders! The 2016 Onda is a beautiful, elegant, linear style that is lighter and silkier than the 2016 Farmer's Motel, a very tart, very funky farmhouse style; and the 2016 Burr Knot, a big, powerful, tannic, robust and extraordinary cider that is one of my favorite fermented beverages produced in New York State.

In addition, we are very excited to host the cidermaker Josh Morgenthau in our store this Saturday, August 18, to taste all of these wonderful marvels! Andrew Farquhar

Treasury Cider 2016 Homestead Semi-Dry Sparkling

This is Treasury's classic slightly-sweet sparkler. Light and limpid with notes of pear and melon, this is an inviting and fresh cider made from old-growth Golden Delicious mixed with some cultivars developed here in New York at the State Agricultural Experiment Station: Cortland, Macoun, Jonagold, and Jonamac. Serve chilled on a porch, preferably with a view. Andrew Farquhar

  • Out of Stock
  • white sparkling
  • 0 in stock
  • $12.99

Treasury Cider 2016 Centennial Still Cider

This still cider is very dry and minerally, with a vinous quality that lends it to pairing with food. Slightly tart, this is perfect with summer squash, smoked trout, or corn on the cob. A blend of Newtown Pippin, Roxbury Russet (America's oldest apple cultivar, dating from back in the days of the Massachusetts Bay Colony), Esopus Spitzenburg, and Winesap. Aged for ten months on the lees before bottling, giving it more depth. 90 cases produced. Andrew Farquhar

  • Out of Stock
  • white sparkling
  • 0 in stock
  • $14.99

Treasury Cider 2016 Onda Bottle-Conditioned

This is a wilder, more unhinged tart cider. Bottle-conditioned and also quite tannic, this is a funky and minerally cider with quite a bite. Made using Goldrush and a mix of old-growth dessert apples planted in the 60s. This is for lovers of sour beer! Only 40 cases produced. Andrew Farquhar

  • Out of Stock
  • white sparkling
  • 0 in stock
  • $16.99

Treasury Cider 2016 Farmer's Motel Bottle-Conditioned

This is a lighter, fresher, more delicate farmhouse style made from old-growth Golden Delicious planted in the 60s, mixed with some Chestnut Crab (crabapples make for fantastically tart cider), Esopus Spitzenburg, and Ashmead's Kernel. Bottle-conditioned but not extraordinarily wild, this is a delicate and very complex cider, with lingering notes of orange rind, brioche, vanilla, and some herbal characteristics on the finish. Andrew Farquhar

  • Out of Stock
  • white sparkling
  • 0 in stock
  • $17.99

Treasury Cider 2016 Burr Knot Bottle-Conditioned

This is an amazing, extraordinarily powerful and fundamentally expressive bottle-conditioned cider. Quite tannic, this cider reminds me of the tart and unsweetened rhubarb pies my grandmother used to make in Maine. The tannins are beautifully integrated and expressive and the finish is long and herbaceous. Drink now or hold up to five years. Hyslop Crab, Granny Smith, Jonamac, Golden Delicious, and Pink Lady go into this cider. Only 60 cases produced. Andrew Farquhar

  • Out of Stock
  • white sparkling
  • 0 in stock
  • $19.99